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Social Issues 2021

  • Bias is a tendency to believe that some people, ideas, etc., are better than others, which often results in treating some people unfairly.
  • Explicit bias refers to attitudes and beliefs (positive or negative) that we consciously or deliberately hold and express about a person or group. Explicit and implicit biases can sometimes contradict each other.
  • Implicit bias includes attitudes and beliefs (positive or negative) about other people, ideas, issues, or institutions that occur outside of our conscious awareness and control, which affect our opinions and behavior. Everyone has implicit biases—even people who try to remain objective (e.g., judges and journalists)—that they have developed over a lifetime. However, people can work to combat and change these biases.
  • Confirmation bias, or the selective collection of evidence, is our subconscious tendency to seek and interpret information and other evidence in ways that affirm our existing beliefs, ideas, expectations, and/or hypotheses. Therefore, confirmation bias is both affected by and feeds our implicit biases. It can be most entrenched around beliefs and ideas that we are strongly attached to or that provoke a strong emotional response.

Credit: Facing History

Online Resources

Recommended Reading

Lesley University Counseling Center :

The Lesley University Counseling Center provides individual short-term counseling and services for on-campus undergraduate and graduate students in degree-granting programs. Our counselors are sensitive to issues of ethnicity, spirituality, culture, sexual orientation, gender, disability, learning differences, and body image. We offer traditional verbal therapy and non-traditional methods, such as expressive arts therapies.

Counseling sessions are held in confidence and are not part of your academic record. If you need or want long-term counseling, we can refer you to outside specialists. Students are responsible for the cost of outside services How to make an appointment:   We are offering remote counseling services.  To make an appointment:  Email counselingcenter@lesley.edu to let us know you want to meet with a counselor.  You can also use this email for other questions you may have.  Call 617-349-8545 and leave a voicemail and we'll get back to you.

CALL TO SAFETY

Call to Safety approaches domestic and sexual violence intervention and prevention work through a social justice and anti-oppressive lens. We communicate this value through community outreach, continuous training and education for our staff, and by applying anti-oppression theory into our Basic Advocacy Training for incoming volunteers. In the interest of joining the movement for racial justice, Call to Safety recently took on the effort to become an anti-racist organization. We recognize that as we live in a culture that is supported by white supremacy, our work towards racial justice will be on-going and in a constant state of becoming. We welcome feedback from the community at large about how we might better work towards this goal.